550 Maranello v 612 Scaglietti

rockits

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I was thinking the same thing. Doesn't stack up to me so can't see that running costs can be so much. Must be average £5kpa or less or it doesn't make sense.
 

rockits

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It doesn't make sense I guess for low to mid value vehicles. Maybe works more for mid to high end value stuff only.
 

philw696

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Still not seen hard evidence if this. Are we talking £3k, £5k, £10k pa?
If really substantial costs, then is the whole Ferrari investment thing just ****/negated by running cost?
My 456 had a £13,000 bill in its history file and the car had done less than 25,000 miles not paid for by me but my 360 Modena cost me £6,000 for service, belts, ball joints and engine ecu that died.
That was actually a pleasurable experience with Carrs Exeter who made the whole experience painless with great customer service.
 

Lavazza

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346
Just to clarify, I'm not seeking an investment. I put thousands of miles on my cars.
My reference to investment is simply that I repeatedly see reference to Maserati values falling, but Ferrari hold value better for not dissimilar running costs. Perhaps inaccurate?
I certainly wouldn't buy a Ferrari and not use it. I'd probably do about 3k to 5k miles annually. So not bothered about buying a car that's been used and looked after.
(Might just hold on to my Granturismo).
 

iainw

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2,857
Just to clarify, I'm not seeking an investment. I put thousands of miles on my cars.
My reference to investment is simply that I repeatedly see reference to Maserati values falling, but Ferrari hold value better for not dissimilar running costs. Perhaps inaccurate?
I certainly wouldn't buy a Ferrari and not use it. I'd probably do about 3k to 5k miles annually. So not bothered about buying a car that's been used and looked after.
(Might just hold on to my Granturismo).
At 100k then I am not sure why you wouldn’t buy and use a modern Ferrari - maybe even with free servicing rather than an old one which will be slower, cost more to maintain etc. I understand it’s all personal preference but for those particular cars and budget I think there is an argument for considering a newer one. There is no doubt they hold their values better if the mileage is sensible. I am sure if graphs were plotted there would be a clear trend
 

JonW

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I agree with the OP on this - I think it depends a bit on what you mean by an investment... and I’m unconvinced about adding in running and maintenance costs.

Personally, I’d be happy with buying a car, and then selling it for the same amount / maybe a bit more after a few years enjoyment. This would make it a good investment, IMO, and I definitely wouldn’t expect it to mean the running and maintenance costs were effectively reimbursed as part of the capital gain...
 

rockits

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I agree. I think it is unrealistic to find many possible options to buy and run at zero cost let alone appreciate beyond the running costs.

I'm kind of the same in that I prefer to take the depreciation killer blow out if the equation where I can. That is always the biggest single cost in the main. If you can take that out and just incur reasonable running costs then it works as long as you use and e joy the car enough.

I work hard to try to lose or keep depreciation to a minimum. Also working even harder to make sure runnings costs are as low as they possibly can be without sacrificing or compromising the spend on the car. It isn't easy but worth it.
 

Ewan

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View attachment 59949
Lovely. But LHD. What about a RHD manual 599? Did they ever build one (or more)? I don’t know. But if they did, presumably it’ll be north of half a million. So in the real World, the last “affordable” manual V12 Ferrari’s are the 612 (still v rare) and the 550 (more easy to find/buy).
 

Phil H

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Ferraris may hold their prices better than Maseratis, but if you take Ferrari asking prices at face value you could be disappointed come sale time. IMHO Ferraris are often presented with ott prices just because they carry the prancing horse, and that distorts people's perceptions of the brand; asking ain't necessarily getting!

PH
 

rivarama

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Lovely. But LHD. What about a RHD manual 599? Did they ever build one (or more)? I don’t know. But if they did, presumably it’ll be north of half a million. So in the real World, the last “affordable” manual V12 Ferrari’s are the 612 (still v rare) and the 550 (more easy to find/buy).
Agreed. RHD 550s can be found for around £70k w decent mileage and good history (not talking concours queen).
I really think long term you cannot lose much money on depreciation - and yes running cost will never be cheap, but that won’t be more than a granturismo.

My 430 has averaged £3k a year including insurance, service, maintenance and road tax - albeit it’s only been 3years I have owned it.
 

outrun

Centenary Club
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A UK RHD 612 in manual (v rare, as from memory, only about 20 were imported) would be a pretty safe bet. Given that 599’s in manual appear not to exist in reality, the 612 is the last V12 Ferrari to have the famous stick and gate.
599 came in manual. Rare and valuable as a result though. At the time, the dealerships told buyers that a manual would be less desirable at resale time. They were wrong again!

Edit - you’ll notice I didn’t read the earlier posts....

Also manual is the Lambo Gallardo which has held value at 70k ish for years now. They like a clutch though.

I like the 612, it looks much better in the flesh than in photos but I think a 550 is a safer buy as the reputation is far stronger.
 

ChrisQP09

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Investments, like everything else, is a matter of luck and thus timing. If anybody recalls the time when you could bag a decent 360 for C class money, you would be laughing now! Nobody can tell what will be 'vogue' in a year's time. As soon as someone sticks a hashtag to something it blows up and the market reacts. Think of the Saudi Prince who once drove a run down G-Wagon around mayfair, these things held well but their values went cosmic after that.

The point being, humans are like sheep, many will follow a trend if someone else credible enough puts his/her name to something. I do personally believe that the 458 in any variant will go north in years to come.
 

Nayf

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It’s more to do with several auctions with lots of 550s/575s in them happening in close succession...
 

Guy

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One of my neighbours had a 550 ('97 car) for 5 years early 2000s. From memory he did about 3-5k miles pa in it and it was collected on a truck annually by Ferrari specialist Bob Houghton. Every service was £3-5k and it dropped from £110k to £34k in value (assume that was the bottom of the market?). 16 mpg (same as Harry Metcalfe over 31k miles in his) and 4 tyres every 6k miles. I would suggest rather more to run than a GTS?
 

Ewan

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3,194
Apparently Ferrari made 10 LHD manual 599's, and 4 RHD ones. Though the brother of a friend of mine has recently had his F1 gearboxed 599 changed to a manual, as the factory still had all the bits required. As you might imagine, this was not a cheap job!
 

Nayf

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Apparently Ferrari made 10 LHD manual 599's, and 4 RHD ones. Though the brother of a friend of mine has recently had his F1 gearboxed 599 changed to a manual, as the factory still had all the bits required. As you might imagine, this was not a cheap job!
Ooof a GTO with a manual...
 

Hurricane52

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197
Whether they are manual or flappy paddle, like the 456 I had, they’re too big to be that much fun, without endangering your licence. Lovely to look at in the garage though.
 

Nayf

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Whether they are manual or flappy paddle, like the 456 I had, they’re too big to be that much fun, without endangering your licence. Lovely to look at in the garage though.
Not really; I’ve driven both and they’re very capable and still exciting at non silly speeds.
The 612, especially the OTO, handles like something half the weight and with considerably less weight up front. It’s got a fruity exhaust which adds to theatre.

The 550 can’t quite hide its big GT origins like the 612 can but that too is capable of B-road frolics without pushing too far over the speed limit. The standard exhaust isn’t quite as fruity so there’s perhaps less theatre at non-supersonic speeds but the steering feel and sharp responses make up for that.

The crucial thing is that both shrink around you when you push on - like all the best GT cars.