Swapsy

GeoffCapes

Centenary Club
Messages
9,212
beware of swapping seats;)

Happened to a mate about 2 weeks ago. He was selling his Golf GTi and they drove off with him holding onto the bonnet.
Fortunately when he came off he wasn't too hurt.

His insurers are refusing to pay as they said he left the keys in the ignition. Unbelievable.
 

rockits

Member
Messages
5,397
Surely this is a stolen car regardless of whether on test drive or not? Car taken without consent means it is stolen. Sure even the most unscrupulous of insurance companies cannot argue that it has been stolen regardless how?

Things like this are only going to depress the private sale market further. Nobody will want to sell a private car any more. I guess the key (sorry!) is nobody gets to test drive the car. Or hold the key at any point.

Or just sell cheap cars privately that not even an idiot car thief would want to steal.
 

GeoffCapes

Centenary Club
Messages
9,212
My thoughts exactly but they initially said that he left the keys in the ignition with the engine running.

I advised him to go to the police and tell them they threatened him then it's robbery as opposed to TWOCKing.

Which should get him the insurance payout.
 

lifes2short

Member
Messages
1,429
typical insurer trying to weasel out of a genuine claim on a technicality, anyway, I suppose the moral of the story is don't exit car unless you have the keys with you as well, even if just swapping over
 

lifes2short

Member
Messages
1,429
so what's the score if you leave your car in your locked on site/integral garage with keys in ignition and then garage is broken in to and car stolen, is that classed as a get out clause for the insurers as well?
 

Corranga

Member
Messages
842
I've read about insurance companies trying to wriggle out of claims where the thief breaks into the house and steals the keys you get the car, I think if they feel they'll get away with it, they'll try anything...

Stealing a 288 GTO is funny, not like it'll get fast without appearing on social media, and bring spotted and noticed by hundreds of folk.
Mind you, you do hear of 1 off famous artworks being stolen now and again..
 

midlifecrisis

Moderator
Messages
6,376
If you can prove that you took 'reasonable measures' to prevent a thief from stealing your car then the insurance companies should pay up.
 

Wack61

Member
Messages
4,290
I have a mate who never ticks the box on anything without reading the T&Cs first

On his house insurance it said something like they'd pay on a break in if force is used

He questioned this with them as telekinesis doesn't exist so if you want to open the unlocked front door you have to use force to move the handle

He's still waiting for them to come back to them

I once had made an insurance underwriter rewrite their policy for every customer
I had a hire & reward policy with trailer cover only the policy said I couldn't use the trailer for hire and reward

When I asked them why I'd be towing a trailer round the UK if I couldn't put anything on it they said it doesn't mean that

ok but that's exactly what it says , if I put goods on this trailer and I get paid for delivering them I'm not insured , so what does it mean then

Er we'll get back to you

A few weeks later I got a new contract along with everybody else they'd insured , that must've cost a bit as it was before email was available to everybody

Christ I sound like I was born in 1926

Er
 

CatmanV2

Member
Messages
29,017
I assume your mate doesn't actually have an insurance policy?

Oh and you looks like you were born in 1925 ;)

C
 

lifes2short

Member
Messages
1,429
I have a contents policy that is known as a "warranty free" policy in the trade, only got know this when the broker told me, in effect if I don't set the house alarm, lock any doors or windows and I am burgled I'm still fully covered, bloody handy when I forget to lock the front door which has happened far too often in the past, going senile:rolleyes: